Interesting & Unusual

FLAG POLES

John Taylor remembers the Torquay resident’s national rivalry in relation to their national flags.

  • Munday flew the American flag on a pine double masted pole.
  • JW Taylor flew the Union Jack and Australian flag on a double masted pole which was two feet higher than the Munday flag pole
  • Mr Beales, in line with his house being called ‘The Pirates Lair’ always flew the scull and crossbones.

At sunrise the flags were hoisted and at sunset they were lowered.

Source –John Pescott  (1985)


SEA-HORSES FOR MUSEUM

Two leafy sea-horses (Phyllopterys foliates), a male and female, 15 inches in length were washed up at Torquay by a storm. They were sent to the Melbourne Museum. While they were a common species, these two were important because they were ‘the most perfect specimens that have yet been received by the Museum authorities.’1

  1. The Argus (Melbourne), 10/1/1934

VICTORIA CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS

The question of having 100 beacon fires lit around Victoria during the Centenary celebrations was referred to the Barwon Heads and Torquay Progress Associations as they were two locations where it was proposed to have beacons lit.

Source: The Argus (Melbourne) 9/8/1934


SHOOTING MISHAP AT TORQUAY

A visitor named Harvey was rabbiting near Jan Juc when the premature discharge of a cartridge inflicted a painful wound along the thumb of one of his hands. He walked back to Torquay for medical help which he found at Melba House where a third year medical student was located. He congratulated himself on having escaped a more sinister injury.

Source: Geelong Advertiser 28/12/1912


TORQUAY VOTED BEST BEACH SPOT

Holiday makers voted Torquay as the best beach spot.       The Argus, 29 January 1952


TORQUAY GETS SURF CARNIVAL

Torquay was chosen by preferential voting, as the site for the international surf carnival during the Melbourne Olympic Games. The carnival to be held on November 25, 1956.   Torquay will also be the site of the Australian surf championships, to be held a week later on December 2.   The Argus, 21 June 1955

 


TORQUAY WINS GOLF CUP

Torquay pair Mrs. B. J. Hyland and Mrs. S. R. Heate returned a splendid net score of 68 – six below par – to win the foursomes event on the first day of the Victory Cup at Geelong yesterday.           The Argus 26 May 1955

 


350- yard SURF DASH SAVES GIRL

Torquay lifesaver Neil Mann swam 350 yards through heavy surf at Torquay yesterday to rescue Pat Turner, of Fisher parade, Ascot Vale.      The Argus, 20 February 1956

 


HOME SOLD AT TORQUAY

A four-roomed villa in Anderson street, Torquay sold for £2500. The villa is furnished and vacant possession. A block of land 50 ft. by 150 ft. on Zeally Bay Road, Torquay went to auction and passed in at £575, the Reserve was £600. Another block 65×165 ft on Park Lane was passed in at £575. Reserve was £650.      The Age, 31 December 1954

 


ANTI-AIRCRAFT FIRING PRACTICE, TORQUAY

Anti-aircraft practice to be carried out in the vicinity of Torquay on November 20 and 21, 1954. The message is being broadcast for the information of ships at sea.   The Age, 19 November 1954

 


MAN DROWNED OFF TORQUAY

William Matthews, 23 years of Ballarat was swept out to sea and drowned at Torquay. Mathhews was a member of a visiting badminton team. He vanished quickly in the waves despite rescue attempts made by several near by bathers.     The Age, 6 March 1951

 


GEELONG FLOOD CAME IN ‘GIANT WAVE’ BARWON SPREADS OUT INTO VAST LAKE

Debris from wrecked houses, fences and trees rode on the crest of a “giant wave” as it swept through Winchelsea and into Geelong. The Barwon, already 10 feet over its banks over the five square mile Belmont Common, fanned out into ta vast lake. Roads were blocked, with only heavy trucks getting through to Torquay which is only accessible through Anglesea and the Ocean Raod.    The Argus, 22 August 1951

 


BREAD FOR TORQUAY

Soldiers in the Torquay military camp received bread baked in Melbourne which was the central distribution point for troops in all Victorian camps.   The Argus, 1 March 1940

 


TORQUAY CAMP NOT COSTLY

Torquay cavalry camp, soon to be abandoned, had cost about £25,000 to equip with electric light, water and other facilities but most of this would be recovered military authorities stated. Water pipes, electric light mains and other fittings woujld be removed for use elsewhere and the loss was expected to be small. The Torquay camp was regarded as a most economical site. There had been reports that the camp had cost about £50,000 to equip and that most of this would be lost.    The Argus, 4 April 1940


A DAMAGING REPORT – SOUTH BARWON SANITATION: Neglect at Torquay

A public health report presented to council showed that in some aspects the yards were in very good condition. In the past the night soil had been dumped in the sandy country near the beach, about a half a mile from the town. The new depot about two miles away was satisfactory. Conveniences showed a grave neglect on the part of the council and householders. The majority were dilapidated, often dirty, and scarcely any were fly-proof. Sanitation of the public buildings was quite neglected but was no worse than in any other country places. The foreshore conveniences were “filthy and stinking”. It was recommended to install double pans immediately. The boarding houses and hotel, except for the conveniences, were fail. It was stated that there were so many flies near one boarding house that they “poured out in a cloud like angry bees when disturbed”. Housing was ample and good, an crowding did not occur. Eating houses were good. Rats and mice were prevalent. Flies were just ignored by everyone and places where they were prevalent avoided.    Geelong Advertiser, 3 May 1924


SOME SEASIDE SURPRISES

On a hot summers day bathers spotted a shark in the waters of Torquay causing a rush out of the water. It was reported some were so panic stricken they ran into the street taking refuge in shops.    Fitzroy City Press, 4 October 1901


 

STRANDED WHALES

A great whalebone whale with was stranded at Torquay/Jan Juc in 1864 skeleton (90ft long) is mounted at the back of the old Museum in the University grounds. It is one of the largest specimens in the world, but had been exposed to the weather since its capture. Around ten years earlier a useless roof was erected to protect it but it was deteriorating.     The Australasian, 11 March 1911

 

 

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